Skip to content ↓

RIghts Respecting School - UNICEF

We are becoming a UNICEF UK Rights Respecting School!

Over the last 6 months, Frith Manor has been taking some exciting steps into becoming a Rights Respecting School by putting the ‘UN Convention on the Rights of the Child’ and the forefront of the schools teaching ethos. As a result of the positive steps we have taken, we are currently on the verge of obtained a national recognised, and highly sought after, bronze accreditation issued by leading children’s charity, UNICEF. 

Frith Manor School aims to be a school where children’s rights are at the heart of our ethos and culture, to improve well-being and to develop every child’s talents and abilities to their full potential. 

UNICEF is the world’s leading organisation working solely for children and young people and their rights. In 1989, governments across the world agreed that all children have the same rights by adopting the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). These rights are based on what a child needs to survive, grow, participate and fulfil their potential and were agreed upon as fundamental rights.

Frith Manor pupils will learn about their rights by putting them into practice every day and alongside this, learn about the responsibilities they have to grow as better young people by observing the rights they and other young people have.

We really hope that you will be able to support our school on our journey towards becoming a UNICEF UK Rights Respecting School. It would be great if you could spend a few minutes reading through our questions & answers on the back of this letter, and also find a bit more about the Convention on the Rights of the Child by visiting unicef.org.uk/crc.

For further information about Rights Respecting Schools please visit:  www.unicef.org.uk/rrsa

 

 

Becoming a Unicef UK Rights Respecting School
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

 

It is an exciting time in the life of Frith Manor school. We have embarked on a journey which will benefit the whole school community, from pupils and staff to parents and governors. Here’s what we think you might like to know about it!

 

You might ask…

 

As school leaders we think that…

What is a Unicef UK Rights Respecting School?

 

When schools get involved, the children learn about their rights by putting them into practice every day.

Children and adults will learn about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) which outlines what children need to survive and thrive, becoming the best they can be and achieving their potential.

Why is this happening?

 

 

A Unicef UK Rights Respecting School models rights and respect in all its relationships, whether between adults and pupils, between pupils or between adults. It is proven to benefit everyone in the school community to grow and learn together. Read more about the Award at www.unicef.org.uk/rrsa

How will becoming a Rights Respecting School benefit my child(ren)?

 

This approach works in many schools across the country to improve well-being and develop every child’s talents and abilities to their full potential. Headteachers from schools involved in the Award say it has improved children’s and young people’s respect for themselves and others and contributed to children and young people being more engaged in their learning.

How can I get involved?

 

 

We hope you will support the school’s journey to become a Unicef UK Rights Respecting School. Please do read about the Convention and Unicef’s work (see below) to see what it’s all about

What is the Convention on the Rights of the Child?

In 1989, governments worldwide promised all children the same rights by adopting the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention recognised that all children have the right to be treated with dignity and fairness, to be protected, to develop to their full potential and to participate. The rights in the Convention describe what a child needs to survive, grow, and live up to their potential in the world. They apply equally to every child, no matter who they are or where they come from.

The Convention changed the way children are viewed and treated – in other words, as human beings with a distinct set of rights instead of as passive objects of care and charity. It is the most widely ratified human rights treaty – only the United States has not ratified it. The UK signed up to it in 1991.

You can read more about it at www.unicef.org.uk/crc   and download a summary of the articles at bit.ly/CRC-over11

What is Unicef?

Unicef is the world's leading organisation for children and young people, promoting the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything they do. Together with their partners, Unicef works in 190 countries to translate that commitment into practical action.

Unicef UK is a registered charity. It raises funds through donations from individuals, organisations and companies and campaigns to keep children safe. Unicef UK also works with schools, hospitals and local authorities in the UK to put children at the heart of what they do.

 

To find out more about Unicef, go to

www.unicef.org.uk